faunus greek mythology

In Nonnus' Dionysiaca he was one of the rustic deities to accompany Dionysus in his war against the Indians. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. They had been engraved with the name "Faunus", and each had a different epithet after the god's name. Pan had always been depicted with horns and as such many depictions of Faunus also began to display this trait. Faunus, ancient Italian rural deity whose attributes in Classical Roman times were identified with those of the Greek god Pan. With the increasing influence of Greek mythology on Roman mythology in the 3rd and 2nd–centuries BC, the Romans identified their own deities with Greek ones in what was called interpretatio romana. An example of this was a set of thirty-two 4th-century spoons found near Thetford in England in 1979. As Pan was accompanied by the Paniskoi, or little Pans, so the existence of many Fauni was assumed besides the chief Faunus. He came to be equated in literature with the Greek god Pan. Faunus, ancient Italian rural deity whose attributes in Classical Roman times were identified with those of the Greek god Pan. [citation needed], Faunus was worshipped across the Roman Empire for many centuries. "Rudra-Shiva and Silvanus-Faunus: Savage and Propitious". 1970. Educated, Hellenizing Romans connected their fauns with the Greek satyrs, who were wild and orgiastic drunken followers of Dionysus, with a distinct origin. His numinous presence was recognized by wolf skins, with wreaths and goblets. According to Virgil’s Aeneid, Faunus told Latinus to give his daughter, Lavinia, in marriage to a foreigner—i.e., Aeneas. Faunus was originally worshipped throughout the countryside as a bestower of fruitfulness on fields and flocks. [9] It is believed that he was worshipped by traditional Roman farmers before becoming a nature deity.[10]. Faunus was originally worshipped throughout the countryside as a bestower of fruitfulness on fields and flocks. Phaunus was an ancient Greek god of forests. Livy named Inuus as the god originally worshiped at the Lupercalia, 15 February, when his priests (Luperci) wore goat-skins and hit passers-by with goatskin whips. Hammond, N.G.L. (Eds.) [7][8], Faunus may be of Indo-European origin and related to the Vedic god Rudra. For the community in the United States, see, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Faunus&oldid=985018446, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles lacking reliable references from April 2020, Articles with unsourced statements from July 2018, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Additionally, Faunus is patron of the Fauns. He was then revered as the god Fatuus after his death, worshipped in a sacred forest outside what is now Tivoli, but had been known since Etruscan times as Tibur, the seat of the Tiburtine Sibyl. The 4th century was a time of large scale Christianisation, and the discovery provides evidence that even during the decline of traditional Roman religion, the god Faunus was still worshipped. In ancient Roman religion and myth, Faunus [ˈfau̯nʊs] was the horned god of the forest, plains and fields; when he made cattle fertile he was called Inuus. Faunus was one of the oldest Roman deities, known as the di indigetes. [12][13], In Gaul, Faunus was identified with the Celtic Dusios. With the increasing influence of Greek mythology on Roman mythology in the 3rd and 2nd–centuries BC, the Romans identified their own deities with Greek ones in what was called interpretatio romana. [11] The female deity Bona Dea was often equated with Fauna. A grandson of Saturn, Faunus was typically represented as half man, half goat, in imitation of the Greek Satyr, in the company of similar creatures, known as fauns. The spoons also bore Christian symbols, and it has been suggested that these were initially Christian but later taken and devoted to Faunus by pagans. Updates? According to the epic poet Virgil, he was a legendary king of the Latins. Pan had always been depicted with hornsand as such many depictions of Faunus also began to display this trait. Faunus was naturally equated with the god Pan, who was a pastoral god of shepherds who was said to reside in Arcadia. After his death he is raised to the position of a tutelary deity of the land, for his many services to agriculture and cattle-breeding. [3] Faunus revealed the future in dreams and voices that were communicated to those who came to sleep in his precincts, lying on the fleeces of sacrificed lambs.

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