what plants grow best around roses

Some of these plants are: Onions – known to repel aphids, weevils, borers and moles Garlic – repels aphids, thrips and helps fight black spot and mildew (for the best results with garlic, you will likely need to plant it with the rose bushes for several years) Formerly a rose curator at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Scanniello offers expert advice on how to create a stunning garden with roses and companions plants, or, as he states in the introduction, “how to get roses to play well with others.". A great resource recommended on this subject is Jackson & Perkins Rose Companions: Growing Annuals, Perennials, Bulbs, Shrubs, and Vines with Roses, by Stephen Scanniello. Some plants that enjoy these same conditions include ground covers, such as antennaria and bearberry. For the best show of flowers and the healthiest plants, rose bushes should receive six to eight hours of sunlight daily. Four o’clocks (Mirabilis) and larkspur (Consolida) act as decoys by attracting rose-loving Japanese beetles to eat their poisonous leaves. This can be done with marigolds, zinnias, or even. The scented foliage of some herbs helps repel insects. Plant companions should both look good together and require similar growing conditions. Fuzzy, gray-green leaves introduce wonderful texture to rose plantings. Plants That Enjoy the Same Conditions as Roses Always maintain good air circulation around your plants to help prevent attacks from pests and diseases. Every day at wikiHow, we work hard to give you access to instructions and information that will help you live a better life, whether it's keeping you safer, healthier, or improving your well-being. A pH of 6 to 7 is best. Tips for Care After Planting Rose Bushes. You can even pick color schemes for different times of the year. Some plants just seem to be made for each other. The feathery purple and blue-gray catmint (Nepeta) beautifully offsets a pale pink rose, and its wispy spires gracefully camouflage any blemishes that may occur on the rose’s foliage. Plants that are too aggressive may crowd the roses and absorb too much water and nutrients from the soil. Give plants full sun in Northern zones; protect them from hot afternoon sun in Southern gardens. including: Tomatoes allegedly prevent black spot, though not many people are inclined to combine roses and tomatoes. Getty How to coexist with success For example, dill and coriander can attract lady bugs. Be sure to do research about whether plants spread before planting them next to your roses. Planting flowers that bloom at different times of the year is especially important if you are growing roses that are not ever-blooming. Yarrow attracts ladybugs who in turn feed on aphids. Research on this topic is inconclusive. Good rose companions are those that hide their bare legs. What to grow with roses – pink-fringed, white penstemons. Companion planting is a gardening method in which you place plants close to each other so that they can aid each others growth or so that the aesthetics of the garden are improved. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/a\/a3\/Choose-Companion-Plants-for-Roses-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Choose-Companion-Plants-for-Roses-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/a\/a3\/Choose-Companion-Plants-for-Roses-Step-1.jpg\/aid8508735-v4-728px-Choose-Companion-Plants-for-Roses-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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